AudioEloquence

 


Pronunciation, Dialect, & Speech Resources for Audiobook Narrators

This site is maintained by Judith West and Heather Henderson for our colleagues in audiobook production.
Many thanks to everyone who has sent us links and ideas. Keep them coming!
Contact Us here

 

 

*****

 

 

 

How to Use AudioEloquence

Use your browser’s Find function [CMD+F or CTRL+F] to search quickly for specific topics or languages.
And be aware that many categories overlap. [More . . .]

*****

 

 

NEW! . . .

AudioEloquence MegaDirectory ☼

Some 1,600 languages and dialects, color-keyed to one or more of 9 multiple-language pronunciation websites
from AudioEloquence. [
Go to the MegaDirectory . . .]

 

 

 

CONTENTS

NOTE: Many sites in this directory offer mobile app versions.

PRONUNCIATION SITES by TOPIC

Bible

Fashion

Food & Drink

Law

Literature

Music

Mythology

Names

Multiple categories

People & PEOPLES

Companies, Institutions, Nonprofit Entities, Etc.

Places

Religions, Faiths, & Spiritual Traditions

Science, Technology, & Medicine

Visual Arts

PRONUNCIATION SITES by LANGUAGE

Multiple Languages

African

SWAHILI / KISWAHILI

Wolof

Yoruba

Asian

Chinese

FILIPINO/PILIPINO/TAGALOG

Japanese

lao & thai

Sanskrit

English (Worldwide)

North American Cultures (non-English)

Gullah

HAITIAN CREOLE

Native AmericaN / FIRST NATIONS

Pennsylvania Dutch

European (non-English)

dutch

French

German

Greek

IRISH & IRISH GAELIC

 

European (non-English) cont’d

Italian

Russian

SCOTS, SCOTTISH, & SCOTTISH GAELIC

Spanish

Swedish

Welsh

Yiddish

Greek (ancient)

Latin

Middle Eastern

Arabic

Bahá’í

Hebrew

Turkish

Oceanian

Maori

Tahitian

DIALECTS, ACCENTS, & GENERAL LANGUAGE SITES

Multiple Languages

English

WorldWide

United Kingdom

North America

North American Cultures (non-English)

Gullah

European (non-English)

dutch

French

scots

Yiddish

ADDITIONAL REFERENCE WORKS

Dictionaries & Translators (human-voiced)

Linguistic Tools

Search Tools and Directories

TIPS, TRICKS, TACTICS

 

 

 

*****

 

Key:

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings = phonetic renderings

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples  = audio samples (including some video)

 

 

PRONUNCIATION SITES by TOPIC

 

Bible

NOTE: Many standard dictionaries include biblical names and terms, and may be the best starting point for some searches.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Bible Words: Phonetic Pronunciation — Extensive pronunciation guide for Bible words and names, especially useful for its notes on common mispronunciations (e.g., for Abednego: “uh-BED-nih-goh [not uh-BEN-dih-goh].”

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Biblical Greek and Hebrew Lexicons — Linguistic resource from (Christian-oriented) BibleStudyTools.com website, including phonetic spellings of words and names, as well as many human-voiced audio clips.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 
NEW

Encyclopedia of the Bible — Comprehensive browsable list of Bible names and terms, each entry offering a phonetic pronunciation. Part of BibleGateway (a vast site whose many resources are difficult to navigate for pronunciation purposes).

 

Fashion

 

 

 

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 
NEW

The Fashion Dictionary: 75 Brands and Names and How to Pronounce Them — From fashion and beauty magazine Elle, a “comprehensive guide to not sounding like a [fashion] rookie.”

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Fashion Pronunciation — Video playlist of pronunciations of 42 major fashion brands and designers, from Imperial Hotel Management College.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 
NEW

How to Pronounce Designer Names 101Harper’s Bazaar magazine’s “A-Z cheat sheet” for pronouncing 44 major fashion designer names.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Watches Pronunciation — Video playlist of pronunciations of 17 world-renowned watch brands, from Imperial Hotel Management College.

 

Food & Drink

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

19 Food Brand Names & 15 Food Terms — Two YouTube pronunciation videos, co-produced by PopSugar and FoodBeastTV, featuring incorrect and correct pronunciations of food brands and food terms, respectively.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

The American Man’s Guide to the Pronunciation of ScotchesEsquire magazine’s list of major brands of Scotch whisky and their phonetic spellings, designed to preclude pronouncing, say, Glenfiddich to rhyme with crochet stitch and thus to safeguard U.S. testosterone levels on yet another front.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

How Do You Say That Word? — Privately compiled food and wine glossary that includes terms from a variety of cultures but primarily English, French, Italian, and Spanish. Any of the several search and browse options described on the home page yields a term or list of terms. Click on a term’s Know More link to access pronunciations both as audio clips and phonetically rendered.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

How to Pronounce Wine Names — Phonetic pronunciations of more than 150 wines from around the world, from the For Dummies series.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

World Food Pronunciations — About.com topic page featuring links to lists throughout the site that provide sound files for terms used in French, Italian, Japanese, and German cuisines.

 

Law

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 
NEW

How to Read a Legal Citation — Document from Brigham Young University Law Library detailing the elements of legal case and statutory citations, and listing the in-full form of various abbreviations found therein. Though “read” should here be construed to mean “decipher,” narrators should be able to construct a spoken version suitable to their context. As always, however, check with producer or author, when possible.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 
NEW

Legal Dictionary — Law dictionary searchable by legal term and definition, as well as alphabetically browsable. Presented by Law.com, an extension of media company ALM.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples 
NEW

Merriam-Webster Law Dictionary — Searchable and browsable subset of the M-W site that includes over 10,000 legal words and phrases, all with phonetic or audio pronunciations or both. Legal terms will appear in a standard M-W search, identified as such in the search drop-down. Legal usage and pronunciation (if distinct from common speech) are identified by the phrase “Legal Definition of ____” — though users may have to scroll down some entries for this identifier.

 

 

Literature

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

The Criyng and the Soun: Chaucer Audio Files — Links to textual excerpts from Chaucer’s works, with corresponding audio readings by scholars, intended “to help students improve their pronunciation of Chaucer’s Middle English.” Links begin mid-page to passages from The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, the Dream Visions, and The Legend of Good Women and the Short Poems.

 

Music

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Big List of Names — Names of European composers and other music-related persons and terms, as well as names and terms in “other languages, mixtures and idiosyncrasies [and] ensemble names.”

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Operas and Composers: A Pronunciation Guide — List of titles and composers of major operatic works; clicking an entry triggers an audio pronunciation.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 

Pronouncing Dictionary of Music and Musicians — “Prepared primarily for the announcing staff of [Iowa Public Radio station] WOI, . . . the dictionary, with its 30,000 entries, is the most extensive of its type now available. . . . [It] includes a PDF file for each letter of the alphabet.” Be sure to check the extensive lists in the Addenda and Corrections pages, as well as the Pronunciation Conventions.

 

 

SEE ALSO Latin Pronunciation Files for Choirs

 

Mythology

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

Age of Bronze: The Story of the Trojan War: Pronunciations — Pronunciation page from Age of Bronze, “the continuing graphic novel series by Eisner Award-winning cartoonist Eric Shanower” about the Trojan War. Assurance is given that “everything in Age of Bronze is based on existing sources, whether mythological or archaeological.” (AE offers no such warrant.)

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
Updated

Encyclopedia Mythica: Pronunciation Guide — Phonetic transcriptions of mythical figures, peoples, and places, mostly from the Greek and Roman traditions but also including some Asian, Middle Eastern, Norse, and Native American names.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Mythology Names — Collection of nearly 1,000 names drawn from 19 cultural mythologies worldwide, most with phonetic renderings. The compilation is part of the much larger Behind the Name site included here under Names|People.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Mythweb: Encyclopedia of Greek Mythology — Extensive glossary of Greek mythological names and terms with phonetic renderings, organized both by alphabetical Index and by Search.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Pronunciation Guide for Lattimore’s Iliad — One-page guide to Greek names occurring in Homer’s Iliad (Lattimore translation), with short sections and notes that also make it an effective Quick Reference to classical Greek pronunciation generally.

 

Names

 

multiple categories

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

ABC Pronounce — Australian Broadcast Company guide to pronouncing “names, places, and other terms not typically found in the dictionary,” with the majority of entries being public figures (Australian and international) from the 1980s through the early 2000s and geographic names. Pronunciations are almost exclusively Australian. Searchable and browsable by letter (“by topic” is not functional).

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

AP Pronunciation Guide — Phonetic renderings of names in the news, as of 2001. Though entries in this unverified and probably unauthorized version of the 2001 AP guide are likely still valid, an up-to-date individual subscription to the official AP Stylebook Online costs $26.00 a year and includes both phonetic spellings and audio samples. NOTE: Many university libraries license the official online version for student and, sometimes, alumni use.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Bridging World History: Audio Glossary — Compilation of “350 place names and historical figures; each defined and pronounced aloud.” Note that audio clips use a Standard American delivery, with no special effort to observe native pronunciation features. Depending on context, this Americanization may lead to distortion (as with Simon Bolivar, rather than Simón Bolívar).

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

British Pathé — Fascinating and valuable site housing digitized video footage from original newsreel company British Pathé from their archives (1910-1970) of newsreels, cinemagazines, and documentaries. Searchable database provides a YouTube-like resource for names, places, and events of the early to mid 20th century.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

inogolo — “Website devoted to the English pronunciation of the names of people, places, and miscellaneous stuff.” The site contains a searchable database of names with both phonetic and audio pronunciations in English. Browse names alphabetically, by tags, or by topic. Also notable are the site’s Web Search, which queries dozens of name pronunciation websites with a single operation, and Web Directory, a topically organized guide to 50+ name pronunciation resources.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

The Pronunciation of 10,000 Proper Names — Digitized facsimile of 1909 book “giving famous geographical and biographical names, names of books, works of art, characters in fiction, foreign titles, etc.,” by Mary Stuart Mackey and Maryette Goodwin Mackey. Made available by OpenLibrary.org.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

VOA Pronunciation Guide — Comprehensive pronunciation database of some 7,000 personal and place-names worldwide, developed in 2000 by the U.S. government’s Voice of America broadcasting service. The guide is constantly being updated, and in 2013 the site was redesigned for a streamlined, simple-to-use search-or-browse user experience.

 

People & PEOPLES

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Asian Name Pronunciation Guide — Directory of given names and surnames in nine major East Asian languages, searchable by names or browsable by language; developed at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Author Name Pronunciation Guide — “Collection of brief recordings of authors & illustrators saying their names,” a free feature from TeachingBooks, an educational service firm.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Baby Names of Ireland — Audio recordings (by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Frank McCourt) of some 200 masculine and feminine Irish given names, together with a bit of information (meaning, lore, or history) for each.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Behind the Name — Impressive database of given (or personal) names from cultures worldwide, accessible via search or browsing. Also features an outstanding collection of links to sites treating given names in an equally wide range of world languages. Sites vary in providing pronunciations, whether phonetic, audio, or both.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Behind the Surname — Surnames sister site of Behind the Name (see above), with its own collection of links to other surname sites.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

BookBrowse: Author Pronunciations — Alphabetically arranged guidance in pronouncing the names of authors whose work has been featured on the BookBrowse site.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Debrett’s Surname Pronunciation — “Correct pronunciation of surnames, place names and titles” from Debrett’s, long-standing British authority on etiquette and publisher of the incomparable Peerage & Baronetage: “Correct pronunciation is quite rightly no longer restricted to what is called Received Pronunciation . . . Surnames of course belong to people, and not troubling to find out how someone traditionally pronounces his or her name may cause offence.”

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

German Pronunciation of Names — German masculine and feminine given names delivered by a native speaker of High German from Schleswig-Holstein / Northern Germany.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

HearNames — Extensive searchable database of audio pronunciations of given names and surnames in various languages; also accessible by browsing alphabetically by language.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

How Do You Pronounce That Name? — Compilation of some 220 surnames with spellings that don’t reflect their pronunciations (phonetically rendered), originally part of a very interesting 2006 article in American Genealogy Magazine.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

How to Pronounce Artists’ Names (Vol. 1) — First of three articles — continued in Vol. 2 and Vol. 3 — from the magazine of the online marketplace Artspace, listing phonetic spellings of a total of 230 names of artists worldwide. Though most names are of contemporary figures, a relative few are from the 19th and 20th centuries.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

How to Pronounce Finnish Names — Extensive collection of sound recordings of Finnish proper names, mostly given names and surnames but also a number of place names and some commercial and institutional names as well. While the alphabetical list and update history pages gather together all the names on the site, the main page also offers nine topical categories (celebrities, geography, politicians, etc.) that list specific individuals or places.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

The Name Engine(R) — According to the site itself, Name Engine “provides the correct name pronunciations of athletes, entertainers, politicians, newsmakers, and more . . . All names are painstakingly researched for authenticity. Personal confirmation is the ultimate goal. At a minimum, they are confirmed by individuals with firsthand knowledge of the name in question . . . Because foreign names inherently sound different in their native tongue, The Name Engine presents the generally accepted “Americanized” version.”

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Name Pronunciation Resources — by Language & Nationality — Adjunct page of the excellent names site Inogolo, providing links to nearly 30 additional names resources grouped by language and ethnicity/nationality.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Nordic Names Forum: Pronunciation — Adjunct of the Nordic Names site, dedicated to providing help in pronouncing given names from Scandinavian countries. Free registration.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Pronounce Names — “The purpose of this website is 3-fold: (1) Lookup [sic] pronunciation of a name. (2) Submit pronunciation of a name so that others can pronounce it correctly. (3) Request pronunciation of a name that you don’t know and would like to find out.” Recently, this site has extended many pronunciations to include audio on both its own site and YouTube.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Pronunciation of Surnames — List of more than 120 surnames, apparently all originating in the UK, together with phonetic spellings of their counterintuitive pronunciations, drawn from the 119th printing (March 1935) of Enquire Within Upon Everything.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 
NEW

Pronouncing Index of Proper Names [Old Norse/Icelandic] — Extensive alphabetical listing of hundreds of Icelandic (Old Norse) names, gathered from the 13th-century mythological and heroic work known as the Poetic Edda. IMPORTANT: Note that each entry is spelled as a phonetic rendering (not in its original script or with an Anglicized spelling). Phonetic guidelines are at the top of the list.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Say How? — Phonetic pronunciations of names of public figures, compiled by the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) for their narrators. Here’s an audio-enhanced version of Say How?, courtesy of the Wolfner Talking Book and Braille Library of the state of Missouri.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Shakespeare’s Characters: A to Z — Comprehensive directory of character names from Shakespeare’s writings, with phonetic pronunciations of those considered to require them. Part of the much-honored Shakespeare Online website authored by literary scholar Amanda Mabillard.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Shakespearean Names — “A simplified pronouncing guide for some of Shakespeare’s names,” with guidelines and spoken examples in an audio file accompanying a list of phonetic renderings. Part of eShakespeare, a project of the Denver Center Theatre Academy.

 

SEE ALSO Names with Counterintuitive Pronunciations; and Pronouncing Dictionary of the Supreme Court

 

Companies, Institutions, Nonprofit Entities, Etc.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 

20 Unpronounceable Tech Brands — and How to Say Them — Blog post (in 2014) from online industry publication ITworld featuring pronunciations of 20 technology companies and products.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
Updated

The ABC Book, A Pronunciation Guide — Phonetic pronunciations of selected brands, companies, and other commercial names, compiled by the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) for their volunteer readers.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Pronouncing Dictionary of the Supreme Court of the United States — Alphabetical catalog of over 500 U.S. Supreme Court cases with audio clips and phonetic spellings, created by Yale law and linguistics students. NOTE: Because of the numerous individuals, institutions, and places involved, directly or peripherally, in these cases, this site may also serve as a more general resource for researching names in those categories.

 

Places

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Coeur d’Alene Native Names Project — “Project with indigenous communities across globe to preserve indigenous place names [as well as] the language and history of those locations.”

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 
NEW

Edinburgh Doesn’t Rhyme with Pittsburgh - A Guide to Scottish Placenames — Highly informative, often (of course) clever annotated collection of Scottish place-name pronunciations. Note that this is page 1 of 3: 1 (Aberdour to Eaglesham), 2 (Edinburgh to Lesmahagow), and 3 (Loch to Wemyss).

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 

GeoBC: British Columbia Geographical Names SearchBritish Columbia government resource for place names and geographical features of that Canadian province. Though not all names include pronunciations yet, updating of that information is ongoing and the GeoBC office welcomes all email inquiries in the meantime.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Great Land of Alaska: Pronunciation Guide — Brief collection of about 70 Alaska place-names, with phonetic renderings and audio (.wav). Caveat per site owner, Douglas Gates: the pronunciations do not attempt to reproduce actual native sounds but rather are those generally accepted by residents.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

How Do You Pronounce Theydon Bois? (London Place Names) — Blog post with phonetic spellings of a couple of dozen commonly mispronounced London place names. Includes additions in the many comments (use your browser’s Find function).

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

MissPronouncer.com (Wisconsin) — “Your one-of-a-kind online resource for hearing audio pronunciations of cities, towns, villages, parks, lawmakers, Indian tribes, counties, forests, and miscellaneous names specific to Wisconsin.”

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 
NEW

Montana Pronunciation Guide — Twenty of “the most common accepted pronunciations of some of Montana’s most mispronounced names,” in an article by the Billings [Montana] Gazette.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Names in English with Counterintuitive Pronunciations (Wikipedia) — Alphabetical lists of “English personal and place names whose pronunciations are counterintuitive to their spelling, because the pronunciation does not correspond to the spelling, or because a better-known namesake has a markedly different pronunciation.” This resource is more extensive than it might seem, as several entries on the page point to additional long lists. NOTE: Hovering your cursor over IPA pronunciation symbols yields pop-ups with analogous sounds for each symbol.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Northwest Pronunciation Guide — Lists of Northwestern U.S. and British Columbia place-name pronunciations (phonetically rendered), compiled by regional native Steven M. Sauke from local sources.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Ohio Place & Feature Names — Pronunciations of cities, towns, and other prominent geographical features in the state of Ohio, created and updated by the Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Place Names of Northern New Mexico — Browsable alphabetized Pronunciation Guide to place names included in the online Encyclopedia of Santa Fe & Northern New Mexico.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples 
NEW

Pronouncing Iowa Place Names: An Audio Guide — Distinctively pronounced Iowan place-names, “expanded to 100 entries” (as of December 2016 update).

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 
NEW

Pronunciation Guide for Illinois Place Names — Searchable facsimile of a 1957 handbook on Illinois place-names, published by the University of Illinois Division of University Broadcasting. Most (if not all) of the terms on this extensive alphabetized list are likely still current.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Pronunciation Guide for National Forests and Grasslands — “Complete list of national forest and grassland names and their pronunciations listed by state,” from the U.S. Forest Service. Includes audio plus three phonetic pronunciations.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Pronunciation of Place Names (UK) — Privately authored selection of mostly UK place-names with often inscrutably counterintuitive pronunciations — for example, Woolfardisworthy (Devon), pronounced “Woolsery,” and Belvoir (Leicestershire), pronounced “Beever.” Some Australian and a very few U.S. localities are also included.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 
NEW

South Carolina Pronunciation Guide — Sizable listing of place-names in South Carolina, created by SCIWAY (South Carolina’s Information Highway) and browsable by alphabetical menu or by searching the one-page directory via your browser’s Find function.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples 
NEW

Talk Like a Tar Heel: North Carolina Place Names — University of North Carolina site offering an alphabetized list of some 160 names of places and physical features, with phonetic and audio pronunciations (click a name) provided by local authors Bland Simpson and Michael McFee.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Texas Almanac Pronunciation Guide — Extensive list of Texas place-names (many of which have colloquial pronunciations) and their phonetic spellings, with guidelines described in first paragraph.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings 
NEW

You Say it How in Michigan? — Collection of nearly 2,000 Michigan place-names, created by the Michigan Braille and Talking Book Library as a guide for their own audiobook narrators. Click on a phonetic spelling to bring up the corresponding sound file.

 

Religions, Faiths, & Spiritual Traditions

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

How to Pronounce Chinese Zen Masters’ Names — List of over 220 Chinese Chan (Zen) Buddhist masters, linked to audio pronunciations. Useful for its stated purpose, as well as for examples of how Pinyin romanizations of Chinese words are supposed to sound.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Pronouncing the Sanskrit Words and Names in the SanghataSound files of pronunciations of terms and names from the seminal Buddhist scriptureĀrya Sanghāta Sūtra, many of which are common to the religion generally and to other Buddhist literature. The page also links to several pdfs dealing with various aspects of Sanskrit spellings and sounds.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Pali Pronunciation — Audio pronunciations of over 625 terms from the Pāli Canon, the earliest known collection of Buddhist scripture and the holy text of the Theravada school of Buddhism.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Voodoo Phrases & Alt Names — Glossary of names and phrases, with phonetic renderings, of deities, rituals, and terms relating to the “Mambo tradition” of New Orleans Voodoo (descended from Haitian Vodou, but emphasizing magical aspects).

 

Science, Technology, & Medicine

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

20 Unpronounceable Tech Brands — And How to Say Them — Self-explanatory page from ITworld, an online pub for “technology decision makers, business leaders and other IT influencers.”

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Bacterial Pathogen Pronunciation Station — Large and well-organized collection of pronunciation sound files, created for students at A.T. Still University in Arizona. NOTE: Some of these American pronunciations are inconsistent with those found at the Intro to Taxonomy site also listed here.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

The Biologist’s Handbook of Pronunciations — Digitized and searchable facsimile of an extensive pronouncing dictionary from 1960 (still accurate), with a range of current and archaic terms from biology and general science (including numerous Latin words), many of them unavailable in other online dictionaries. Suggestion: Use the alphabetized list rather than the Search function. See pages ix-xiv for a guide to diacritical marks and phonetics

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Botanical Latin Pronunciation Guide — Guides on the site OverPlanted.com, originally created for Horticulture magazine, providing “recommended pronunciations [in] accord with older references . . . , rather than with current popular usage, which is often inconsistent and unreliable.”

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

Drugs.com — Well-known pharmacological resource with a vast searchable and browsable database of medications, both generic and brand name, that includes a phonetic transcription for each entry.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

How Do You Pronounce IT? — List of phonetic spellings with MP3 clips for pronouncing 95 commonly mispronounced (or mysteriously pronounced) terms, abbreviations, and acronyms in the field of information technology.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples
NEW

How to Pronounce Drug Names — Audio/video guide to the pronunciation of 200 major pharmaceuticals, including both generic and brand names. Accessible ONLY from the linked alphabetical browse list at the very top of the page. Created by pharmacology professor Tony Guerra for his students.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples
NEW

How to Pronounce the Top 250 Drugs — Searchable database of 250 major drugs with audio pronunciations, created and maintained by pharmacist-educator Sean P. Kane. Search box is situated at mid-page.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Medical Terminology Pronunciation “Jukebox” — Extensive click-and-listen pronunciation “jukebox” of medical terms, organized by body system and topical categories with alphabetized word lists within. Not term-searchable. From the Wisc-Online (Wisconsin Technical College System) digital library of resources. (If pronouncer’s Wisconsin accent is problematic, find and listen to a word you know how to pronounce and then extrapolate related words from that.)

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

MediLexicon: Dictionary — Section of the extensive medical news, info, and resource site with phonetic spellings of thousands of medical terms via search or alphabetical listing. NOTE: When your search term is a compound (e.g., plantar fasciitis), pronunciations will appear only in each individual word-component’s entry (e.g., plantar and fasciitis, respectively).

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

The Merck Manuals Online Medical Library: Pronunciations — Audio pronunciations of medical and pharmaceutical terms, created by the Merck pharmaceutical company as part of the free online publication of its authoritative Merck Manuals.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples 
NEW

Merriam-Webster Medical Dictionary — “Search medical terms and abbreviations with the most up-to-date and comprehensive medical dictionary from the reference experts at Merriam-Webster.” Note, too, that any search of the general Merriam-Webster site will yield a result from the Medical Dictionary, if the term exists there; just scroll down through the definition.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

Mineral & Lapidary Pronunciation — Alphabetized list of some 200 rocks and gemstones (“Rocks for Dummies”) with phonetic spellings, from the Santa Rosa Mineral and Gem Society.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples
NEW

Missouri Botanical Garden: Plant Finder — Search or browse for over 7,500 plants, most grown in the Garden’s display center. Plants can be found by scientific name, common name, and/or selected characteristics, and each entry has an audio pronunciation.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

Stars Pronunciation GuideEditors’ Choice!
Extraordinary collection of some 250 of the brightest stars named to date, with phonetic spellings that indicate syllablic stress as well as any alternative pronunciation. Created and maintained by the staff of the award-winning site Space.com, whose mission is “To provide an amazing journey celebrating space exploration, innovation and discovery.”

 

 

Visual Arts

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

How to Pronounce the Most Deceptive Gallery Names — From the magazine of online marketplace Artspace, a list of phonetic spellings of 73 major art galleries around the world.

 

PRONUNCIATION SITES by LANGUAGE

 

Multiple Languages

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

BBC: A Guide to LanguagesThe BBC’s archived collection of basic information about 20 world languages, providing for each a brief inventory of “key phrases” with written and audio pronunciations; a concise treatment of “the alphabet,” describing and demonstrating (via audio) similarities to and differences from English sounds; and a boxed list of “related links” to external language-learning sites.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

dict.cc: Multilingual Dictionary — Translation database compiled and checked by user-contributors and including audio recordings of words and selected phrases and sentences. Focus is on English and German, with each of those languages translated into 25 others, building an extensive work-in-progress database of European languages. Click on a language pair to access bilingual alphabetical word lists and a search box.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

FAMiliarization — Wide-ranging compendium of cultural and language learning aids for countries worldwide, sponsored by the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC). Access audio pronunciation files, romanized spellings, and any native transcriptions by searching, browsing language or country lists, or clicking the interactive site map. Unique and well-ordered Language Survival Kits offer Basic Language Guides, Pronunciation Guides, and collections of military, PR, and medical words and phrases.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

ForvoEditors’ Choice!
Self-proclaimed (and probably accurately so) “
largest pronunciation guide in the world,” with recorded pronunciations in over 200 languages. Users can browse words by Language or Category, or search the Forvo database. Registered users (no charge) may submit new words for pronunciation and offer their own pronunciations.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

ielanguages — Authoritative and highly useful/usable site featuring tutorials on 20 world languages, each including pronunciation guidance. Tutorials have been prepared by several different experts, so arrangement and content will vary. Some feature pronunciation guideline pages with excellent phonetic and English equivalency charts (no audio); others incorporate audio and sometimes video; and two (French and Spanish) are especially rich in pronunciation resources of all kinds.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Language Guide — “A collaborative project to develop interactive, sound-integrated language learning resources,” with speech samples available in Dutch, German, Spanish, Mexican Spanish, Turkish, Arabic, Portuguese, Russian, Mandarin, Japanese, and Korean. Clicking a language yields categories, within which are image maps with rollover audio pronunciations of category-related words and pop-ups of each word written in its Latin alphabet equivalent.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Larousse Dictionaries — Site offering free access to 21 dictionaries from the renowned French publisher, including 8 translation dictionaries to and from English. Word entries provide human-voiced audio pronunciations, as well as dozens of phrases and idioms that contain a given word.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Omniglot Editors’ Choice!
An “online encyclopedia of writing systems and languages” offering a wide range of language learning resources and tools, including many pronunciation tips and aids. (NOTE: Links not always highlighted.) Distinctive aspects include Language Exchange sites (shared learning and practice with native speakers), Articles (e.g., “Secrets of Speaking with a Genuine Accent“), a Celtic Languages guide, short Video Lessons for several languages, Online Radio Stations (for 100+ languages), and Site Search. For best overview, check out the Site Map and the A-Z Index of languages. Suggestion: Spend some time perusing this rich and diverse site so you’ll know what’s here when you need it.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Pronounce It Right — Copious and eclectic audio collection of names and terms from many areas of culture and endeavor, and in over 30 languages. Access by search or by browsing Categories and Languages drop-down lists (lower right-hand corner box).

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

pronunciationguide.info — Subtitled “A Guide for Classical Radio Announcers,” this site aims “to teach speakers of North American English how to pronounce [21 European] languages . . . with a respectable degree of confidence and correctness” by providing some simple but valuable phonetic guidelines and tips for each. An accompanying page, “The Big List of Names,” provides both phonetic spellings and audio clips of the names of individuals, ensembles, and works of classical music, grouped by language.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive — Rich database containing authoritative audio recordings of individual words and sounds from over 200 languages, with corresponding word lists showing phonetic transcriptions and English equivalents. Especially valuable for audio samples of obscure languages or those with hard-to-locate audio files. Access by language (Language Database) or by individual word search.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

WikiTravel Phrasebooks — Foreign-language phrasebooks designed “so that an English-speaking traveler can ‘get by’ in an area where [a given] language is spoken.” Pronunciation Guide sections are most helpful, using analogous English-language sounds as models (rather than IPA transcriptions). Phrasebooks are “color coded according to their level of completion and overall quality­.”

 

SEE ALSO AlphaDictionary

 

African

 

SWAHILI / KISWAHILI

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

KIKO (Kiswahili/Swahili) — An acronym for a phrase meaning “Kiswahili using the computer,” this site (sponsored by the African Studies Institute at the University of Georgia) provides guidelines for pronouncing Kiswahili (also widely known as Swahili), specifically on the page Matamshi ya Kiswahili (Kiswahili pronunciation). Further information and lessons, including vocabulary and video conversations with transcriptions are available through the Anza masamo (Enter course) link.

 

 

Wolof

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

How to Make the Sounds in Wolof — Introductory of three Phonetics pages that together provide concise yet thorough pronunciation guidance on the Wolof language, spoken primarily in Senegal, Mauritania, and the Gambia. While the Sounds page relies on IPA transcription, the Vowels and Consonants pages utilize recordings of sample sounds and words. The site’s creator, eminent Wolof scholar Dr. Richard Shawyer, has included links to other helpful resources on several pages.

 

YORUBA

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

AKOYE (Yoruba) — An acronym for a phrase meaning “successful Yoruba learning on the computer,” this site (sponsored by the African Studies Institute at the University of Georgia) offers Yoruba pronunciation guidelines, most pointedly on the page Ìxcnupe Ède Yorùbá (Yorùbá pronunciation). Yoruba is a tonal language whose transcription may require reading and/or reproducing a special font that reflects tonal inflections. Access additional lessons, vocabulary, and video conversations via the bere eko (enter) link.

 

 

Asian

 

CHINESE

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

A Guide to Pronouncing Chinese Names (Pinyin Transliteration) — Extensive description and phonetic examples of how to pronounce Chinese sounds that have been rendered into the Latin alphabet (i.e., romanized) in Pinyin, the present-day system for transcribing written Chinese for most Western readers. NOTE: This site does not distinguish tonal variants.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Learn Cantonese — Introductory resource on Cantonese Chinese. Extensive vocabulary lists provide pronunciations in phonetic transcription and, sometimes, via sound files. Audio samples, indicated by Chinese characters with a (very light) beige background, occur most abundantly in the Basic Vocabulary section. No search function available.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Mandarin Chinese-English Dictionary — Audio dictionary of Mandarin Chinese, with searches available in Chinese script (traditional or simplified) and in Pinyin transliteration, as well as English«Chinese translations. Click the speech bubble beside the large Chinese characters in results page to hear the pronunciation.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples 
NEW

Mandarin Chinese Pinyin Chart — Exceptionally useful chart (on the language-learning site Yabla) providing audio renderings via clickable syllables of the Pinyin (official Chinese) system of romanization. Each syllable, when clicked, yields a further clickable menu of that syllable’s four possible tones, a feature invaluable in pronouncing Chinese. A link to sound-augmented info on tone pairs, another major facet of Chinese speech, appears at page bottom and as a top tab.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Transliterating Chinese — Brief but very helpful clarification of the two major systems used to represent Chinese characters and words phonetically in English: the older Wade-Giles (e.g., Peking; Mao Tse-tung) and the newer, official Pinyin (Beijing; Mao Zedong). This page provides examples and guidelines for converting between the two systems and for pronouncing each.

 

 

Filipino/Pilipino/Tagalog

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Brief Guide to Filipino Pronunciation — Concise guide to pronouncing Filipino (Pilipino), the official language of the Philippines, including basic sounds, accents and stress, and irregular pronunciations.

 

 

Japanese

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Japanese Dictionary — Excellent multifaceted dictionary of the Japanese language, permitting searches using English words; Romaj­i, that is, Japanese words spelled using the Roman (Latin) alphabet; or either of the two main Japanese writing systems, Kanji and Kana. Results yield a table containing all these elements, plus a sound recording of the word.

 

lao & thai

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Thai Language / Lao Language — Introduction to pronunciation characteristics of these two related Southeast Asian languages, with thorough but clear discussions of both the phonetic and the tonal elements of each.

 

 

Sanskrit

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Learning Sanskrit: Pronunciation 1 & Pronunciation 2 — From the extensive Sanskrit & Sánscrito website, resource pages offering sound files and descriptions for pronouncing Sanskrit letters (Pronunciation 1) and 73 Sanskrit words, names, and titles (Pronunciation 2). NOTE: In the latter page, the several sound files labeled “Invalid Source” can, in fact, be accessed by right-clicking on them for a shortcut menu, selecting Copy Audio URL, and pasting that URL (to an online MP3 file) directly into your browser’s address bar.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Pronouncing Sanskrit — Two brief treatments of Sanskrit pronunciation for English speakers. A Rough Guide offers seven basic rules that cover “about 80% of pronouncing Sanskrit.” The Comprehensive Guide, only slightly longer, provides individual attention to the sounds of each vowel, consonant, and special combination.

 

English (Worldwide)

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples
NEW

YouGlishEditors’ Choice!

Valuable site offering video clips culled from YouTube, each including the chosen word or phrase as spoken during an interview, lecture, ad, performance, or other footage, cued to start seconds before the searched item is spoken. Most clips are pulled from reliable sources (e.g., TED Talks and high-end commercials vs. school video projects and news sound-bites). Search results can be filtered for U.S., British, or Australian pronunciation and allow pronunciations to be chosen contextually — by culture, speaker’s native accent, occasion, etc.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

howjsay.com — “A free online Talking Dictionary of English Pronunciation,” produced by teacher-scholar Tom Bowyer. Howjsay offers an extensive database of audio clips using mostly Standard British English pronunciations, but also World English and American English variants, where useful (see details at Notes).

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Middle English Pronunciation — Pronunciation guide to Middle English (aka Chaucerian English), with clear and concise descriptions of the consonant and vowel sounds followed immediately by audio samples of words containing the sounds.

 

 

SEE ALSO The Criyng and the Soun: Chaucer Audio Files

 

North American Cultures (non-English)

 

gullah

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Glossary of Gullah Words — Extensive word list in a table comprising a column of phonetically spelled Gullah creolized pronunciations of English words, the latter in a second, corresponding column. Part of the larger Gullah Language site included here under North American Cultures (non-English)|Gullah.

 

haitian creole

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Kreyòlab — Succinct discussion and demonstration of pronunciation features of Haitian Creole, together with tips on contextualizing various spellings. Site is “in progress,” so check back for updates.

 

Native American / FIRST NATIONS

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples
Updated

FirstVoices (British Columbia) — Audio pronunciations available from extensive word lists in 51 different Canadian indigenous languages. Type term (in either the indigenous language or in English) into the search box at the top of this page for results including audio indigenous pronunciation. Alternatively, click on one of the individual languages displayed, then on the Learn Our Language tab, and then on the Words tab, to access a word list and a language-specific search box [English or indigenous]. NOTE: To download special fonts for displaying certain characters, see this page.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

Guide to the Pronunciation of Indigenous Communities and Organizations in BC (pdf) — Listing drawn from the September 2018 Guide to Aboriginal Organizations and Services in British Columbia and “created with input from First Nations and other Aboriginal organizations, as well as from First Peoples’ Cultural Council.”

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Inuktitut Tusaalanga: Glossary — Alphabetical list and sound files of words and phrases from Inuktitut, the language spoken by most native Inuit people of the eastern Canadian Arctic. Inuktitut is best understood as “a spectrum of dialects that vary enormously from one end of the Arctic to the other,” and four of these dialects are available here via drop-down menu. This award-winning site also has a Pronunciation page, with phonetic guidelines and examples keyed to Glossary entries. 

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

Lenape Talking Dictionary — Extensive searchable resource for the language of the Delaware (Lenape) people. Access audio by native speakers from the database of over 17,000 words by searching in either Lenape or English (for the Lenape translation). Product of the Lenape Language Preservation Project.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Native Languages of the Americas — Alphabetized index of tribes and languages cataloging a massive database of nearly 800 North (U.S.), Central, and South American native languages. Each entry’s informational page typically includes a pronunciation guide, vocabulary, grammar, cultural info, and internal and external links. The site’s many intersecting subpages can be confusing, but two subsections — languages by language family and selected links to other resources on Native American languages — may be especially helpful.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

Pronunciation Guide to First Nations in British Columbia — List of some 170 tribal (First Nations) names in British Columbia, arranged alphabetically and offering phonetic pronunciations for each. [NOTE: Formatting problem makes list hard to read about a third of the way down. Workaround: Highlight/copy/paste the list into Word or other document to read. Site contacted requesting fix.]

 

Pennsylvania Dutch

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

A Guide to Pronunciation of Pennsylvania-Dutch Words — Brief phonetic guide to sounds in the language of the Amish people, provided by romance novelist Wanda Brunstetter.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples
NEW

Pennsylvania Dutch Dictionary — “First online, searchable dictionary for the Pennsylvania Dutch dialect, also known as Pennsylvania German.” Not all entries contain pronunciations, but those that do provide audio. In addition, the About page offers pronunciation help, including how to use its wildcard search to access dialects and orthographic variations associated with Pennsylvania Dutch.

 

European (non-English)

 

dutch

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Hear Dutch Here — Dutch language learning website from Marco Schuffelen, featuring sound files in categories such as Dutch pronunciation and names (personal, geographical, etc.), as well as various tips (e.g., “Dutch Accent for The Stage“).

 

French

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

French Pronunciation — Audio-supported resources covering various aspects of French pronunciation, from long-established info directory About.com. Among the most useful for basic reference purposes are Beginning Pronunciation (an audio-linked pronunciation guide), the on-site Dictionary (2,500+ entries) and Dictionaries and Word Lists page, the French Rhythm article, and the discussion of ten Pronunciation Mistakes and Difficulties.

 

German

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

A Guide to German Pronunciation — Descriptive text and charts, linked to extensive audio examples to provide practice with German pronunciation. Site offers standard pronunciation as well as some regional variations and loan-word (e.g., English, French) exceptions. NOTE: Right-click on sound files and open a second window to view text while listening.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

LEO Deutsch-English Dictionary — German-English searchable dictionary, with audio pronunciation clips (most human-voiced) and a related language forum.

 

Greek

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Guide to Greek Pronunciation Conventions — Concise, easy-to-use Greek alphabet chart with audio files reflecting the sounds for each letter in Erasmian, Attic, biblical (Koine), and modern Greek. The chart is item 2 on the page, with further links to helpful internal and external resources primarily under item 3.

 

 

see also Greek (ancient)

 

irish & Irish Gaelic

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Beginner’s Guide to Irish Gaelic Pronunciation — Nonacademic guide, based on the Ulster dialect, intended as “a rule of thumb for people who are unfamiliar with Irish (e.g., most English-speaking people outside Ireland).”

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Irish Gaelic — Synthesized text-to-speech pronunciation system, developed by the Phonetics and Speech Laboratory of Trinity College, Dublin. Input or paste up to 2,000 characters of Irish Gaelic text to generate synthesized audio. NOTE: AudioEloquence has limited confidence in synthesized speech tools, however sophisticated. But in this and some other instances, more reliable sources may be lacking at present.

 

Italian

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Dizionario italiano multimediale e multilingue d’Ortografia e di Pronunzia — Searchable Italian pronouncing dictionary with both phonetic transcriptions and audio samples. Also includes many proper nouns.

 

Russian

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Russian Alphabet — Chart demonstrating pronunciation of Cyrillic letters through both phonetic spellings and audio samples.

 

SCOTS, scottish, & scottish Gaelic

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

Online Scots Dictionary — Browsable and searchable (English-Scots/Scots-English) dictionary from Scots-Online.org, with helpful guides to spelling and phonetic symbols used, as well as links to other Scots-language resources.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Shetland Dictionary: Pronunciation Section of the browsable and searchable dictionary of words in the Shetland dialect of the islands at the northernmost point of Scotland, compiled by Shetland teacher and scholar John J. Graham.

 

 

see also Dialect Map of Shetland

 

spanish

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

American Heritage(R) Spanish Dictionary — Spanish-English searchable dictionary providing American English and Latin American Spanish audio pronunciations of some 70,000 entries.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Study Spanish: Spanish Pronunciation — Language tutorial with extensive audio support, organized as a series of vowels, consonants, intonations, diphthongs, etc., with audio samples of representative words, phrases, and sentences.

 

swedish

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples
NEW

Learning Swedish: Pronunciation — Unit of “a free online course in Swedish for beginners,” created and administered by the Swedish Institute. Especially useful are sections on Pronunciation and Spelling (4.1) and Prosody (2) — addressing the often-neglected topics of stress and accent.

 

 

TURKISH

SEE Turkish under Middle Eastern

 

welsh

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Welsh-English / English-Welsh On-line Dictionary — Searchable two-way translation resource that provides phonetically rendered pronunciations and some audio clips.

 

Yiddish

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Yiddish Dictionary Online — Yiddish dictionary searchable by English equivalent of Yiddish word, romanized spelling of Yiddish word, or Yiddish word typed in Hebrew alphabet. Results provide basic phonetic spellings.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Yiddish Glossary — Informal compilation by Yiddish-character performer, covering many common words and phrases, all with phonetic transcriptions and many with audio samples.

 

SEE ALSO Yiddish Words

 

Greek (ancient)

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Ancient Greek Tutorials — U of C, Berkeley, instruction modules designed to assist textbook-based learning and focusing on ancient Greek pronunciation and accentuation features. A Pronunciation Guide provides clickable Greek letters, sounds, and breathing notations linked to sound files.

 

 

see also Greek under European (non-English);

 

Latin

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Ecclesiastical Latin — Guidelines on “the pronunciation and usages of Latin by the Catholic Church [as distinct] in some respects . . . from the Latin spoken by Caesar, Seneca and Cicero, called Classical Latin.”

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

How to Pronounce Latin — Page that describes pronunciation features of Ecclesiastical Latin — spoken since the 3rd century AD, in contrast to supposed pre-3rd-century Classical pronunciation.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Latin Links & Resources — Collection of ecclesiastical Latin links compiled by Father Gary Coulter and extending from Latin courses and discussion groups to Latin dictionaries to additional collections of Latin language links.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Latin Pronunciation Demystified (pdf) — Brief but highly instructive document on the four “rival” Latin pronunciation schemes, written by Michael A Covington, Ph.D., widely cited scholar in linguistics and computer engineering.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Latin Pronunciation Files for Choirs — MP3 files of clearly articulated Latin pronunciation accompanying the texts (typically every 2-6 lines) of five common Catholic choral works: Ordinary (or Order) of the Mass, Requiem, Stabat Mater, Te Deum, and Magnificat.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Wheelock’s Latin: Pronunciation Audio Files — Sound and word pronunciations, ancillary to the preeminent introductory Latin textbook Wheelock’s Latin. Sound files, with phonetic transcription and translation, are accessed per chapter, and no search function exists.

 

Middle Eastern

 

ARABIC

NOTE: Some sites reflect the fact that Arabic is written and read from right-to-left.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

ArabDict.com — Dictionary offering definitions and audio pronunciations in English-Arabic/Arabic-English, as well as from and to Arabic and other (largely European) languages. Searchable in Latin or Arabic script.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Islamic Dictionary — Site providing searches via “words [and phrases] written using Latin characters but [that] are Islamic in origin,” usually originating in Arabic. Entries generally comprise audio pronunciations, accessed via red audio icons, as well as Arabic script renderings, which may enable further searches on sites that recognize Arabic script (e.g., forvo.com). (NOTE: Not IE-friendly; recommend using Firefox or Google Chrome.)

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

English-Arabic Phonetic Dictionary — Translation process that provides English-to-Arabic translation,  including both Latin and Arabic script.

 

Bahá’í

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Bahá’í Glossary — Collection of words and phrases common in the Bahá’í faith, containing Arabic and Persian vocabulary in audio format with accompanying definitions.

 

hebrew

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples
NEW

Chabad.org Online site dating from 1988 and devoted to the Jewish community’s internet educational outreach efforts. Typing a term into the search box provides results including video and audio resources. (Be sure to click the More▼ option for possibilities.)

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples 
NEW

Hear It in Hebrew — Listing of 140 videos on YouTube channel, providing “words and names in Hebrew with a modern Hebrew, Israeli pronunciation.” Use your browser’s Find function (CMD+F or CTRL+F) to locate a proper name and a family-related term. Section on Christmas isn’t searchable and therefore is hit-or-miss.

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Hebrew - Alphabet (Aleph-Beth) Transliteration and Pronunciation — A compact but useful one-page primer in Hebrew pronunciation; a “rough guide . . . sufficient to help understand the principles [of Hebrew grammar and the alphabet] and to follow the transliterations of different terms and understand how to use them.”

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Hebrew for Christians: Glossary — A fairly extensive database of Hebrew and some Yiddish words with phonetic renderings. Entries are English transliterations, rather than Hebrew script, and the main Glossary page offers a brief pronunciation guide.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Learn Hebrew Phrases with Audio — Straightforward site designed to teach basic, useful Hebrew by way of 54 topics with 1,211 Hebrew phrases and sentences, in both Hebrew script and transliterations, with accompanying human-voiced audio. Most effectively used in conjunction with phonetic pronunciation guides such as the two preceding Hebrew sites.

 

 

TURKISH

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Turkish Pronunciation Guide — Brief and easy-to-use key to pronouncing letters and letter combinations in the Turkish language (which is written in the Latin alphabet).

 

Oceanian

 

MAori

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples
NEW 

Māori Dictionary — Varied and thorough dictionary of the Maori language, provided by New Zealand’s Te Whanake Maori language resources organization. Each entry has sound files and additions are ongoing.

 

 

Tahitian

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

Useful Tahitian Words and Phrases — Basic pronunciation guide to the sounds of Tahitian vowels and consonants, with phonetic spellings of common words and expressions. NOTE: Tahitian is closely related to Maori, about which more can be learned and heard in the entry above.

 

DIALECTS, ACCENTS, & GENERAL LANGUAGE SITES

 

Multiple Languages

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

AccentHelp — Site offering free samples of its 35 for-purchase accent and dialect-learning recordings for actors, including British, American, and World varieties. The brief samples provide significant models and one or two tips sufficient to be useful to some performers. NOTE: AE neither endorses nor opposes purchase of this or any other site’s products.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Global Recordings Network — Vast, well-organized, and easily accessible database of audio samples of 6,000+ languages, many with written scripts available, created by Christian evangelist group GRN. Exceptionally valuable for learning rhythms and other speech features of both obscure and major world languages.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

How to Do an Accent — Thirty-five video guides on accents and accent features ranging from Pittsburgh to Persia, presented by actor and voice/speech coach Andrea Caban on HowCast.com. Particularly useful in focusing not just on the listening to the sounds themselves but on engaging the muscles of articulation and other means of generating key sounds in each accent and dialect.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

How To Do A(n) _____ Accent — Series of 3-minute video mini-courses on accents from British actor and dialect coach Gareth Jameson, most from regions of current and former Commonwealth countries (Welsh, Cockney, South African) and a few from farther afield (German, New York, Russian, American Southern). Good resource for quick-and-dirty accent lessons focusing on salient pronunciation features.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Internet Resources for Voice and Speech Professionals: Dialects & Accents — Section within the Internet Resources of VASTA (Voice and Speech Trainers Association) that lists numerous sites (most with audio samples) focused on varieties of English speech worldwide. In addition to broad national and regional surveys, the list includes sites dedicated to Scots, Irish, and Mexican American speakers.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Scripture Earth Resources — Evangelical Christian site comprising a searchable and browsable index of 600 languages (from 78 countries), many of which link to a page offering downloadable PDFs and MP3s of New Testament books (or chapters within them). Some pages link instead or in addition to a sister site offering either both of these options (Global Recordings Network; see above) or a combined reading-and-listening platform (Bible.is).

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

StoryCorps — Ongoing oral history archive of more than 45,000 interviews with Americans from all walks of life. Browse the bilingual collection by category or search by keyword (e.g., region or states).

 

SEE ALSO Omniglot

 

English

 

Worldwide

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

IDEA (International Dialects of English Archives)Editors’ Choice!
“Online archive of primary-source dialect and accent recordings for the performing arts” created by author-educator Paul Meier. “All recordings are in English, are of native speakers, and include both English language dialects and English spoken in the accents of other languages.” The site’s extensive Special Collections cover (with audio) topics such as Speech and Voice Disorders and General [or Standard] English.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Sounds of New Zealand English — Recordings of a native English-speaking New Zealander voicing selected words to demonstrate common pronunciation features.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Speech Accent ArchiveEditors’ Choice!
Vast set of recordings of “speech accents from a variety of language backgrounds. Native and non-native speakers of English all read the same English paragraph,” with recordings accompanied by phonetic transcription. Multiple samples represent each language, varying by gender, age, region, and fluency. Browse by speaker or region, or use advanced search.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Vincent Voice Library — Collection of 40,000+ hours of English-language speeches and broadcasts by over 100,000 world leaders, public figures, broadcast announcers, and private citizens around the world. Database records date from 1888 to the present and are searchable by keyword (e.g., event or place), name, or year.

 

United Kingdom

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Accents & Dialects — Section of the British Library’s “Sounds” collections, with audio from five major historical and sociolinguistic resources, available in their entirety or by browsing by county, date, or map.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Sounds Familiar? — Compilation of 71 sound recordings and over 600 short audio clips from two British Library Sound Archive collections: the Survey of English Dialects and the Millennium Memory Bank. Special sections include in-depth looks at Received Pronunciation (regionally neutral accent), Geordie dialect (of the inhabitants of Newcastle-upon-Tyne), and Minority Ethnic English.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

A Tour of Accents — In a single, unedited take, “professional accent and dialect coach Andrew Jack seamlessly switches between the various accents that are scattered across the UK, demonstrating the subtle distinctions between different varieties of English.”

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

The Voices Recordings — BBC’s program archive of voice samples from regions across the UK. Of the 300 recorded conversations (involving 1,201 people), “250 are in English, 31 are in Scots, 10 are in Welsh, six in Scots Gaelic, three in Irish, three in Ulster Scots, and one each in Manx and Guernsey French.” Access via search or interactive map.

 

North America

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

Harvard Dialect Survey: Maps & Results — Useful resource that spotlights some key regional differences in pronunciation and usage across the United States. Responses from some 30,800 participants have been collated to show, through phonetic spelling, rhyming words, and color-coded maps, how selected words vary from region to region — for example, aunt (as in “ah” or “ant” or “caught” or “ain’t”); coupon (as in “coop” or “cute”); and grocery (as in “sock” or “shock”).

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings
NEW

A Lexicon of New Orleans Terminology and Speech — Fascinating page on the culture, colloquial usage, and pronunciation of New Orleans speech, created by a local from a self-professed bilingual family — “we spoke both English and New Orleans-ese.” Terms and idioms are listed alphabetically, and most include pronunciation notes.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Meet Mama Lola (Louisiana: Haitian American) — Video of New Orleans Voodoo high priestess Mama Lola, an excellent illustration of Haitian-accented English.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

North American English Dialects, Based on Pronunciation Patterns — Massively detailed interactive map charting American English dialects throughout the continent. Clicking on most cities or towns yields a table of audio and video samples of representative native speakers. Many map annotations and insets, as well as supplemental materials, are also helpful.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Pittsburgh Speech & Society — Site created by University of Pittsburgh linguists, devoted to the city’s distinctive dialect and including many recorded samples and described pronunciation features.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Tejano Voices — Oral history project site containing more than 175 English-language recordings of Mexican Americans from throughout the state of Texas.

 

SEE ALSO American Languages; and TIPS, TRICKS, TACTICS for methods that can yield excellent results, such as the “Oral History” search.

 

North American Cultures (non-English)

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

American Languages: Our Nation’s Many Voices Online — The American Languages project, begun in 2003, aims “to digitize, interpret, and make accessible audio recordings documenting linguistic diversity in the United States.” To date, some 60 hours of audio have been collected, consisting largely of interviews with speakers of German-American and American English dialects from various states.

 

Gullah

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Gullah Language: Hear-and-Read Gullah — Informal phonetic renderings of three texts (the Lord’s Prayer, the 23rd Psalm, and M.L. King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream”), with audio files of each in the English-based, creolized Gullah language originated by slaves in South Carolina, Georgia, and the coastal Sea Islands.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Gullah Tales — Professional storyteller Aunt Pearlie Sue (the creation of Anita Singleton-Prather, a native of the Sea Islands in Beaufort County, South Carolina) tells six folk and fairy tales in both English- and Gullah-language versions, with basic English-language text accompanying simple animations. In addition, a teaching activity presents 15 English words that, when clicked, produce their spoken and transcribed Gullah equivalents.

 

European (non-English)

 

dutch

 

SEE Hear Dutch Here

 

 

French

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

How to Fake a French Accent — Pointers on speaking English with a French inflection, directed at English-speaking Americans and offered by the long-time Web resource About.com. The content more reliable than the cheesy title implies.

 

scots

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Dialect Map of Shetland — Clickable map of the Shetland Islands, northernmost area of Scotland and, indeed, the UK, with sound files of individuals representing 18 island localities.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Scots Language Centre — Site dedicated to promoting the Scots language, featuring a wide variety of audio samples of ten major Scots regional dialects.

 

SEE ALSO The Voices Recordings

 

Yiddish

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Yiddish Words: An Audible Glossary of Familiar Terms — Via NPR, the Yiddish Radio Project presents David Rogow and Pearl Sapoznik in character dialogues designed to define and demonstrate nine Yiddish words. Helpful for picking up the rhythms of Yiddish speech. (Requires RealPlayer)

 

ADDITIONAL REFERENCE WORKS

 

Dictionaries & Translators (human-voiced)

 

Symbol indicating site uses phonetic renderings

AlphaDictionary — Impressive database of dictionaries and glossaries for some 300 world languages. Clicking on a country from the list yields linked dictionaries and language resources that, in turn, produce rollover annotations useful in sorting and selection.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Dictionary.com — Extensive reference work based on Random House Dictionary and including results from several other major dictionaries (e.g., Collins, as World English Dictionary). Features pronunciation sound files as well as both IPA and less complex phonetic spellings.

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

MemidexEditors’ Choice!
Aggregator of English-language dictionaries and thesauri that features countless British and American audio pronunciations directly available from Memidex search results (click icon beside entry title to go to pronunciation category).

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Merriam-WebsterEditors’ Choice!
Definitive pronunciation resource for audiobook publishers, with human-voiced audio pronunciations as well as phonetic transcriptions.

 

Linguistic Tools

 

Symbol indicating site uses audio or video samples

Google Translate — Simple to–from translation tool for 76 languages, from the familiar search engine company. Not considered authoritative by itself, but can be useful in combination with other resources.

 

Symbol indicating site uses both phonetic rendering and audio/video samples

Interactive IPA Sounds — Interactive charts featuring audio samples that accompany written labels and descriptions of each of the sounds in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), from eminent dialect coach Paul Meier.

 

TIPS, TRICKS, TACTICS

 

• Call an ethnic restaurant.

 

• Call embassies, consulates, or national airlines. (Embassy.org has a page for each embassy in Washington, D.C., and many pages have links to consular and other offices throughout the U.S.)

 

• Call public offices or libraries in a region for pronunciation of place-names and prominent local persons. City and county non-emergency phone centers can be very helpful. Operators or dispatchers are usually happy to answer your question — and answer it briefly! Also, they’re available 24/7.

 

• Search Google or other search engines using the following format:   word + pronounce

 

• Calling a business phone number that appears in web search results will usually yield a person, answering machine, or voicemail that provides the correct pronunciation of the personal or company name you seek.

 

• Working late? Call bars or taverns for local place-name pronunciations (or for entertainment).

 

• Search for < Oral History + state or region > to find a variety of audio interviews of regional speakers, many from decades-old archives. Notable examples include the Montana Memory Project, the University of Alabama at Birmingham Oral History Collection, the University of Southern Mississippi Oral History Digital Collection, and StoryCorps.

 

• Search YouTube or Google Videos. Pronunciations for difficult-to-locate place-names can often be found in local news story results from a search such as < _____ Avenue accident > or < _____ School news at 5 >. For a person’s name, try < _____ speech > or < _____ award > and similar expressions.

 

• Search NPR for audio of relevant interviews to get pronunciations. [NOTE: Don’t assume interviewer/announcer pronunciations are authoritative, as they sometimes definitely are not.]

 

• Search BBC as for NPR above.

 

• Search Wikipedia for general information (sometimes pronunciations or non-roman scripts), ESPECIALLY an article’s “External Sites” list, which is likely to provide more useful and authoritative resources.

 

• Look for forums associated with cultural or language sites — even if the sites themselves haven’t provided answers, their followers tend to respond quite willingly and reliably.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Use AudioEloquence
(cont’d)

 

 

AE entries are organized and cross-referenced to make using the site intuitive and systematic.

 

 

AE categories are seldom mutually exclusive. So if you don’t immediately find what you need, think creatively and explore links and subjects within other categories that may be broader or related.

 

 

— Not all Web resources are created equal. Be aware of what AE does not contain, as well as what it does. We carefully explore and review sites for accuracy, authoritativeness, and ease of use.

 

 

Read AE’s annotations to develop a sense of the range of topics and subtopics covered by these resources. Annotations can add substantial value to your ability to best use these resources.